PREMIERE! ETD + WNET ALL ARTS 🙌 by ETD

ETD teams up with WNET ALL ARTS
for a deeper look into EARTH!

How are artists responding to the threat of climate change? A new collaboration from @PerilandPromise and @allartstv focuses on the artists, musicians and dancers who are creating haunting — and necessary — work about our endangered world. ⁠

ETD's Climate Artist episode premieres on WNET ALL ARTS!!
Click the video link below to learn more about our year long EARTH project as we perform the first four works at the Brooklyn Botanic Gardens.

We couldn't be more excited about this experience and the chance to spread awareness for a cause so near and dear to our hearts. Thank you to all of our collaborators in our EARTH Project. We couldn't have done it without your hard work and determination to make our world better through dance.

Enjoy!

EARTH IS MADE POSSIBLE BY A GENEROUS MATCH GRANT FROM THE MARTA HEFLIN FOUNDATION.

Please consider making a 100% tax deductible donation to EARTH - a visual, physical and auditory “wake up call” to the impact of our actions on global warming.

EARTH Choreographer Spotlight: Eryn Renee Young by Eryc Taylor

EARTH: Part 4 of 5 Studio showings
Man Forgets Earth

Check out the interview below!

Photo Credit: Shannel Resto

Photo Credit: Shannel Resto


How long have you been dancing? What college did you attend?

I began dancing at the age of 2, and I received a degree in Contemporary Ballet Choreography and Fine Art from the Gallatin School of Individualized Study at NYU.

When did you start creating work and what was the name of your first work? (feel free to elaborate)

I began creating work as a young teenager when I was recovering from a series of injuries, and I found that I could still be exploring in the studio if I helped my teachers prepare their combinations for class. I took a number of choreography classes at various summer programs and in college, and founded my professional company, XAOC Contemporary Ballet, at the age of 19.

Which choreographers inspire you the most and/or what is your favorite piece of choreography? 

The choreographers who inspire me most now are those who make ballet that “doesn’t always look like ballet.” It makes definite use of the traditional vocabulary but expands upon and opens it, speaking directly to the audiences in a way that honors the classical tradition while feeling fresh, accessible, and exciting to dancers and viewers. Some of the first pieces that inspired me early in my choreographic journey that I always return to are Balanchine’s Agon and Graham’s Clytemnestra, and now I continue to seek inspiration across the decades and continents among generations of art makers in both ballet and modern dance. 

What is your goal as a choreographer? Do you want to start your own company? Or, work project based?

My goal as a choreographer is to create work that brings beauty and joy to a world often caught in darkness and despair. I want those who experience my work to feel wonder, and that through art, light, and love, we can overcome darkness. My company’s mission states that there is room for ballet to evolve into the 21st century, led by women with a vision of inclusivity, generosity, inventiveness, spirit, humanity, and love. Our artists seek to use this incredible art form to bring joy and delight to our audiences far and wide. In a tumultuous world that has great capacity for both beauty and ugliness, we as artists have a responsibility toward the creation of beauty. In 2020, we celebrate 10 years of creative contribution to the professional dance world.

What have you learned about climate change from this experience? Have you done any research while creating your work that has changed your view on Earth's current state? 

I did extensive research in preparation for this piece, and one of the things that touched me the deepest was the human scale of the devastation brought on by climate change that we are already experiencing on Earth right now. I think for many, especially in the developed world, climate change seems like a distant future, something to maybe start thinking about that will maybe begin to cause problems several generations down the line – many think not my life, not my problem. But it is happening, right now. It is happening not just in the third world, where undoubtedly it strikes the hardest, but in our own backyards. The natural disasters of the last twenty years have been some of the worst in historical memory – just this week, we had a hurricane that is stronger than any Atlantic hurricane on record, and the devastation is not yet known. The California wildfires destroyed the homes and lives of some of the wealthiest areas in the world. The number of people that died in the 2004 tsunami was equivalent to 2/3 of the population of the United States. The immediacy of the issue is astounding. It is happening here and it is happening now.

What do you hope the audience takes away from Man Forgets Earth?

I hope it touches their hearts. I hope they see that climate change is larger than politics, larger than profit, but that at its heart, the relationship between the earth and humanity is a love story, one that, like all relationships, has good times and bad, sickness and health, and requires true committed work to maintain a balance. For me, I’m an eternal optimist, and I do not want this story to end in tragedy. I hope that others feel the same, and are moved to act.

What do you think of the mission of our EARTH project and how has the process been so for you working as a guest artist? 

I hope it touches their hearts. I hope they see that climate change is larger than politics, larger than profit, but that at its heart, the relationship between the earth and humanity is a love story, one that, like all relationships, has good times and bad, sickness and health, and requires true committed work to maintain a balance. For me, I’m an eternal optimist, and I do not want this story to end in tragedy. I hope that others feel the same, and are moved to act.

**Don’t forget to get your FREE tickets to the showing this Sunday (9/8/19) 1PM at the Martha Graham Studio Theater 55 Bethune Street, NYC 11th Floor CLICK HERE

BIO:

Eryn Renee Young is the founding artistic director and resident choreographer of XAOC Contemporary Ballet, a New York City-based neoclassical ballet company founded in 2010.She is an inaugural fellow of the Jacob’s Pillow Ann & Weston Hicks Choreography Fellows Program and a 2018 resident choreographer of the University of North Carolina School of the Arts Choreographic Institute.Her choreographic work has been showcased at the Battery Dance Festival, The Ailey Citigroup Theater, the Young Choreographer’s Festival at Symphony Space, Boston Contemporary Dance Festival at the Paramount Theater, the White Wave Dumbo Dance Festival at the Jay Street Theater and the Gelsey Kirkland Arts Center, Dance at Socrates, Mark Morris Dance Center, the Martha Graham Studio Theater, the CounterPointe Series with Norte Maar and the Brooklyn Ballet at the Actor’s Fund Arts Center, the Valentina Kozlova International Ballet Competition, the Brooklyn Dance Festival, Brooklyn Ballet’s First Look, the Pushing Progress Series, Hatch, the Choreographer’s Canvas at Manhattan Movement and Arts Center, NYC10: an initiative for NYC Dance Week at Dixon Place, Dance New Amsterdam, Triskelion Arts Center, Steps on Broadway, the Moving Beauty Series, the Algonquin Arts Center, Peridance Capezio Center, the Boston Conservatory, the Bart Leukede Theater at Rider University, the Stevens Center in Winston-Salem, the Agnes DeMille Theater at U. North Carolina School of the Arts, and New York University, including her first solo choreography show entitled “A New Era: Elements of Dance” in 2009 and a second evening in the Gallatin Arts Festival in 2012. Read More

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Photos: Shannel Resto


EARTH Composer Spotlight: Stephanie Ann Boyd by Andrew Tran

Marking our first collaboration with Stephanie Ann Boyd, ETD is thrilled to be working with her! Before we hear her newest commission this Sunday 9/8 @ 1 pm lets learn a little more about her and her process…

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How long have you been creating music? What type of musical training and eduction did you receive?

I've been composing orchestral and chamber music in earnest since I was 14 but before that, I was making up melodies for myself on the piano so that I would have music to play myself that was wholly my own - this habit came from watching my grandmother play her own piano music on her living room piano every time I would go and visit her, which was quite often as a young child. I began to be heavily involved in youth orchestras as a violinist in middle school and high school and went on a European youth orchestra tour when I was 15 and the next year auditioned into the Michigan Youth Orchestra and the grammy-winning Pioneer High School Orchestra. I was one of the last students of the great violin pedagogue John Kendall (the man who brought the Suzuki method to the United States in the 60s), and he was the first person to see the orchestral works and violin concerto I wrote in high school. I went to Roosevelt University in Chicago for undergrad and New England Conservatory for graduate school, both with degrees in composition, and immediately after receiving my degree from NEC, I moved from Boston to New York City so that I could continue my music making by working with artists of the highest caliber!

When did you start creating work and what was the name of your first work? (feel free to elaborate)

The first baby work I wrote was a little piano piece called "Rain is Falling".... cute, I know. But my first symphony, written at 16, was called "Zeit durch das Jahr" and  my first chamber music piece, written at 17, was called "Fantasia Olora"  for cello + piano (which is at 12 years old still a piece that gets performed every season!)

Which composers inspire you the most and/or what is your favorite piece of music? 

Barber, Mancini, Kenton, Prokofiev, Gubaidulina, Pärt, Corigliano, Zimmer - my favorite piece of music? Tabula Rasa by Pärt, An American in Paris by Gershwin, MacArthur Park by Webb, Lujon by Mancini... there's so much. 

What made you fall in love with music? Can you think of any specific moment in your life that made you realize you loved composing?

When I realized that writing my own orchestral music gave me just as much frisson as playing first violin in Tchaikovsky Symphony finales. 

What is your goal as a composer? Do you want to be a resident composer for dance company? Opera? Theater?  

I want to write meaningful, long-lasting repertoire for all instruments so that the bass trombone and the flute can feel (as much as possible) like they're as represented as the violin or the piano. I want my work to break existing understandings and fears of "new music" so that contemporary music becomes just as mainstream and enjoyable as work in the western cannon written by "dead white dudes". 

Where do you see yourself in ten years as a composer?

You'd have to ask my many journals, spreadsheets, nightmares, and daydreams... 

What have you learned about climate change from this experience? Have you done any research while creating your work that has changed your view on Earth's current state? 

I've been a vegetarian for 29 years so I've always been conscious of the fact that I'm trying to do something even though at times it's been uncomfortable - throughout the research process I saw imagery that was profound and shocking; icebergs going belly up, graphics that showed changes in the earth's constitution over time, warnings about climate change from nearly 100 years ago, and the actual numbers on what being vegetarian can actually do as a starting point for helping the earth heal.

What do you hope the audience takes away from Man Forgets Earth?

Heartbreak. Anger. Understanding the momentum that is behind our current situation, pushing it to a brink we really do not want to be at. 

What do you think of the mission of our EARTH project and how has the process been so for you working as a guest artist? 

It's wonderful to be a part of something that we all have such varied experience on with regards to subject matter. Charting out emotions and trying to see ourselves as the main characters (earth, man) has been really fascinating as we try to sort out what we want this story to mean to us and to our audiences. 

Please RSVP for “Man Forgets Earth” choreography Eryn Renee Young and original score by Stephanie Ann Boyd titled, “IMMEMORY”.

BIO:

Michigan-born American composer Stephanie Ann Boyd (b. 1990) writes melodic music about feminine subject matter and the natural world for symphonic and chamber ensembles. Her work has been performed in nearly all 50 states and has been commissioned by musicians and organizations in 37 countries. Boyd’s five ballets include works choreographed by New York City Ballet principal dancers Lauren Lovette, Ashley Bouder, NYCB soloist Peter Walker, and XOAC Contemporary Ballet’s Eryn Renee Young. Eero, commissioned by Access Contemporary Music and Open House New York, was a ballet written for the grand opening of the TWA Hotel at JFK Airport.

Boyd’s music has been commissioned and performed by concertmasters of the BBC Symphony Orchestra, the Singapore Symphony, the New York City Ballet Orchestra, the Des Moines Symphony, the Faroe Islands Symphony, the Anchorage Symphony Orchestra, the Fort Smith Symphony, the Arkansas Philharmonic Orchestra, and principal players in the Colorado Symphony Orchestra.  Her music has been played by the Boston Modern Orchestra Project, the New England Conservatory Philharmonic, the Cape Cod Chamber Orchestra, the New York Jazzharmonic, the River Oaks Chamber Orchestra, the Roosevelt University Orchestra, the Eureka Ensemble, the JVL Festival Orchestra, the Texas State University Symphony, the Cremona International Academy Orchestra, the UW La Crosse Symphony, and the El Paso Youth Symphony. Her work has been presented by the Thalia and her Sisters concert series, the Moirae Ensemble, and Sandcastle New Music in New York City, Aepex Contemporary Music in Michigan, Cincinnati Soundbox, Collage New Music and the New Gallery Concert Series in Boston, and others. Stephanie has worked with conductors such as Andrew Litton, Cliff Colnot, Gill Rose, Earl Lee, Nathan Aspinall, Julian Benichou, Kristo Kondakci, Lina Gonzales, and Kevin Fitzgerald.

Boyd has made ballets with New York City Ballet principal dancer Lauren Lovette (Red Spotted Purple commissioned by the Ashley Bouder Project, 2018), New York City Ballet principal dancer Ashley Bouder (Out of the Dust commissioned by NYU Center for Ballet and the Arts, 2019), New York City Ballet soloist Peter Walker (Eero, commissioned by Access Contemporary Music and Open House New York for the grand opening of the TWA Hotel at JFK, 2019), and choreographer Eryn Renee Young (EARTH, commissioned by the Eryc Taylor Dance Company, 2019). Upcoming projects include a ballet choreographed by Abdul Latif for NYU CBA and a ballet for NYC's Satellite Collective.

Recent commissions include a new violin concerto for Kurt Nikkanen and the Chesapeake Youth Symphony Orchestra, a ballet for the Ashley Bouder Project, a Mass for women’s choir, soprano solo and orchestra for The Eureka Ensemble, and a piece for the Chicago College of Performing Arts Wind Ensemble. 

Boyd was the 2016-18 Composer in Residence for the Eureka Ensemble in Boston, the 2013/14 Collage New Music Fellow, and has had composition residencies at summer festivals in Italy, Canada, and the US. Boyd has taught composition privately for eight years and her students have been accepted into the music schools at University of Toronto, University of Michigan, Indiana University, UC Boulder, Michigan State University, and others. She is a recipient of the Donald Martino Award for Excellence in Composition and is a two-time recipient of the CCPA Vector Award, and has won numerous grants from the Women’s Philharmonic Advocacy. She holds degrees from Roosevelt University and New England Conservatory (with honors). Boyd was one of the last violin students of renowned pedagogue John Kendall. 

Stephanie’s music has been praised as “[with] ethereal dissonances” (Boston Globe), “[music that] didn’t let itself be eclipsed” (Texas Classical Review), “arrestingly poetic” (BMOP), and “wide ranging, imaginative” (Portland Press Herald). Boyd belongs to the Iceberg New Music Composers Collective. Her catalog is published by TRN Music and FEMOIRE. A critic for American Record Guide and I Care If You Listen, Boyd lives in Manhattan. She is dressed by MILLY for this season’s concerts and events.

ALL ARTS X Peril and Promise | #ClimateArtists launches series trailer by ETD

Today is an exciting day for ETD + Peril and Promise and ALL ARTS team! They just launched the trailer for our upcoming #ClimateArtists series, which focuses on artists from a wide variety of disciplines who are creating work that addresses – sometimes hauntingly – our global climate crisis. The show premieres its first episode next Thursday on Sept. 5, with an incisive look at how young poets are grappling with our warming world. Our episode airs September 12 and features our performance of EARTH at Brooklyn Botanic Garden.

 Check out the trailer here:

How are artists responding to the threat of climate change? A new collaboration from @PerilandPromise and @allartstv focuses on the artists, musicians and dancers who are creating haunting — and necessary — work about our endangered world. Premieres Thursday, Sept. 5

But we need your support more than ever. We are only $5K away from matching our $20K grant from the Marta Heflin Foundation. Your donation will help us realize the full production of EARTH and allow us to bring some of the natural wonders from the Brooklyn Botanic Garden performance, into the theater. To help make this show possible, please visit etd.nyc/donate to make a tax-deductible donation today!

ETD Outreach Instructor Spotlight: Johari Mayfield by Andrew Tran

Johari with her students at Camp Felix.

Johari with her students at Camp Felix.

An interview with Johari Mayfield

When did you begin dancing? Has being a dance teacher/dancer been a dream job of yours? My love affair with dance began with double Dutch as a very young child. I followed my friend to a ballet class and never looked back. I can still jump rope though. Dance/dance teaching are definitely dream professions. I'm grateful to be fully self expressed as an artist as well as have the ability to empower others through movement.

I started teaching at ETD Outreach in spring of 2018 and teach at two sites in the Bronx at PCMH and Acacia supportive housing sites. It’s been a blessing because I get to share dance/exercise/therapeutic movement with populations that may not have access. My goal is to be fully self expressed through movement sharing my truth, passion and joy so that others feel free to do the same.

As a dancer, I’ve worked with Forces of Nature, Peggy Choy, and Heidi Latsky. I was a resident artist at HERE Arts Center 2008-2011 where I produced my own work integrating dance and film.

Describe your style of dancing and teaching. What artists have impacted you the most?
I'm a movement/dance mutt. Double dutch, ballet, modern and African in that order. My teaching style has evolved over time from an old school rigid style to a more inclusive flow with structure. I love Jacques D'Amboise and NDI. Many artists have impacted me including Sylvester Campbell, Abdel Salaam, Maureen Fleming, Dyane Harvey and Sheila Kaminsky to name a few.

What public figure has had the biggest influence on you and why?
Gandhi. I took a business course once where one of the leading questions was what/who will you stand for. Then we were shown a film of Gandhi on a hunger strike to protest British rule over India. As an artist in recovery, I was inspired by that. In the context of dance teaching, I stand for people who may not have the access to dance/movement as a therapeutic agent, particularly in environments that are challenging--- jails, detox/recovery centers, domestic violence shelters

Do you have a quote or mantra that you live by? Yes! “One Day at a Time”, I know that's very simple and maybe even a little cliche, but as I get older, I'm discovering how to stay present and allow things to unfold as they need too. I like to rush and know that something is going to work without room for mistakes, new discoveries, etc. When I keep things in the day without worrying about what's next, life is so much more enjoyable.

What's been the largest obstacle/struggle in your life to becoming an artist in NYC? How did you overcome it?
Myself. Honestly, I've allowed myself to stop taking chances because of one reason or another. Fear of failure has kept me from a lot of opportunities because I was afraid of looking bad. I'm overcoming it by feeling the fear and doing it anyway. Since approaching life from that perspective, I've met tons of new collaborators and friends who often times have the same fears that I do.

To learn more about ETD Outreach, or to book a workshop at your location, please find us online: ETDOutreach.org


A little more about Johari…

Johari Mayfield is a dancer, choreographer, activist, healer, and ACE certified personal trainer living in New York City. Johari utilizes her dance background along with cardiovascular exercises, strength training and yoga with her clients to hone the synergies of mind/body, strength and flexibility. Johari’s community outreach initiatives have included children’s workshops on fitness and healthy eating at Lincoln Medical and Mental Health Center, movement and fitness with Girls Education and Mentoring Service (GEMS), an organization committed to empowering survivors of sexual exploitation and Reveal NYC, a nonprofit organization that encourages female survivors of domestic violence in self-care. In addition, she's also taught cardio dance classes at the Rose M. Singer Center at Riker’s Island for female inmates and team building through dance in her “Hip Hop Lit Squad” for children at the Athleta Flatiron location in NYC. She currently is on faculty at Ifetayo Cultural Arts Academy, and works as an instructor on the ETD Outreach team. She's the proud new mom of Lucy a rescue Pitbull.

SAVE THE DATE for Johari’s New Show: RECOVERY at 14 St Y’s 2019-2020 Arts+Culture Season
Sept. 12-14, 2019 Thurs.-Sat. @7:30 PM and @1PM Saturday
About my show, Recovery: Although I create events that serve my recovery and the recovery of others, this is the first time I have created an entire body of work based on my personal healing and performed it myself! It's both exciting and nauseating, but I feel the urge to crack open and explain the addict, the society they struggle to remain sober in, and the process of recovery.
This work blends movement and technology, you'll follow my self examination where I ask questions that often time never have a satisfying answer:
With drugs readily accessible, can I stay sober?
Am I a good person only when I am sober?
Am I an evil person trying to make amends?
Is there a finish line to recovery?

This hybrid work, poignantly titled RECOVERY, will be performed at the 14th St Y's 2019-2020 Arts+Culture season, Life and Death, New York, NY.

There will be a talk back after the 7:30 PM show on Saturday, Sept 14, we'll be discussing
The Opioid Crisis: Legal Drugs with Lethal Consequences. Artistic Director, Eryc Taylor, will be a guest speaker on the panel.
RECOVERY
Dates/Times: Sept. 12-14, 2019 Thurs.-Sat. @7:30 PM and @1PM Saturday
Tickets can be purchased here:
14streety.org/recovery
Tickets $12 with code: LIFE. Valid online only


RECOVERY is fiscally sponsored by Fractured Atlas and co-sponsored by Harkiss Designs and Gay and Sober. Please review this page for more info.